HoganWillig

We Practice Law for Your Peace of Mind

Social Security Disability – FAQ

November 15th, 2012

Am I eligible for Social Security Disability?

In order to qualify for SSD you must have worked in a job(s) covered under the Social Security System and paid Social Security taxes. By working and paying taxes, you earn Social Security credits. The number of credits required to qualify for disability depends on your age and how long you have worked. You can check your Social Security Statement to see how many credits you have earned or contact Social Security’s toll free number at 800.772.1213 for this information.

Can I work and still receive Social Security Disability Benefits?

Working and receiving benefits is possible under certain circumstances. Generally, if you make less than $800.00 gross wages per month, and your work is not considered “substantial” than you can work and also receive Social Security Disability benefits.

If I win my case how much money will I receive?

This depends how much you have paid into the Social Security system. Monthly individual amounts for Social Security Disability range from approximately $800.00 to $2100 per month. If you have dependent children under age 18 you will be paid an additional 50% of your benefit amount for your children’s support.

How far back will Social Security go in awarding me benefits?

You cannot get paid back benefits dating more than one year prior to your application date. It is very important to submit your application for Social Security Disability benefits within 17 months of stopping work.

How does Social Security decide who is disabled?

The Social Security Administration considers an individual disabled if they meet the following criteria:

  • The applicant cannot do work they previously did;
  • The applicant cannot adjust to other work because of the applicant’s medical condition (s);
  • The applicant’s disability has lasted or is expected to last for at least one year or result in death.

If you need assistance with an existing claim or have questions about a potential claim please feel free to contact me at 716.932.6814.

Comments

One Coment

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  • Troutman & Troutman, P.C. says on: December 3, 2012 at 10:45 am

     

    You are correct to say that working is sometimes permitted for benefits recipients, but the SSA also has programs for disabled people who want to try reentering the workplace. These people are allowed a trial work period of nine months with no risk to their benefits status. If the person is able to work and bring home a “substantial” amount each month, he or she will have three more years to work before social security benefits are ended.

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HoganWillig

We Practice Law for Your Peace of Mind